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Orders Placed by 2pm EST Ship Today! | Free Shipping on Orders Over $89
Orders Placed by 2pm EST Ship Today! | Free Shipping on Orders Over $89

Barrier Guard Specialty Bluebird Feeder - Copper Tint

by Erva
Original price $83.99 - Original price $83.99
Original price
$83.99
$83.99 - $83.99
Current price $83.99
Availability:
Only 5 left!

This is feeder is one of our favorites for keeping hungry eastern bluebirds fed while keeping the European starlings at bay! Bluebird feeder comes with a clear glass (dishwasher safe) mealworm cup and wire mesh barrier guard. This baffled bluebird feeder is surrounded by sturdy vinyl coated wire mesh with 1-1/2" square openings to keep out starlings and most squirrels. The top and bottom are fully galvanized steel and powder coated in Erva's exclusive "Copper Tint" finish for years of durability.

The glass cup is 3.25" in diameter and 1" deep and holds about two handfuls of dried mealworms.  This feeder comes with a galvanized cable. The cable with the slide pulled down to secure the lid adds 12" to the height of the feeder, which measures 14" W x 8" H. 

Attracts the following birds: Eastern bluebirds, chickadees, downy woodpeckers, titmice, nuthatches, orioles, wrens, and occasionally warblers. We've had mixed reports from customers: sometimes northern mockingbirds fit and sometimes not.

We recommend adding the Perch Accessory, sold separately, to help your bluebirds perch together, decide on an entry point, and gain easy access to the feeder.

You may also mount it on a 1" pole by using a Pole Adapter, sold separately.

Need more mealworm feeding capacity and a dish that's winterproof? Try swapping in this new Aluminum Replacement Dish.

Made in the USA.

Shipping Information

In stock orders placed by 2pm EST typically ship the same day.

All items ship for a flat rate of $6.95 to $24.95 depending on item size and destination. All orders totaling $89.00 or more will ship for free.

Expedited shipping options such as UPS 2-Day and Next Day are available on the checkout page.

EXCEPTIONS: Some very large or overweight items may require extra shipping charges. Extra charges are noted in the main product description.

Click here for more details on shipping policies and ship times.

Warranty and Returns

We want you to be satisfied with your purchase which is why we offer a 30 day return policy.

Click here for full details of our return policy.

Each manufacturer specifies their warranty period. We are always happy to help make sure any vendor warranties are resolved to your satisfaction.

Customer Reviews

Based on 15 reviews
93%
(14)
7%
(1)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
D
Deborah Barman
Great Feeder

It is as beautiful as it looks. Perfect weight which makes it easy to hang yet it can ride out strong summer storms. Waiting for my first bluebird but that will happen in time. Glad I bought it.

J
John Shaw
It took a while

I bought my feeder in July 2022 to feed meal worms to bluebirds. I didn’t see much success until now. This spring, a male and a female have been feeding every day around 6:00 am. They would take turns each patiently waiting for the other to finish eating. An couple days ago, they started stuffing several worms in their beaks and flying away, so they must be feeding babies!

Thank you for taking time to review, and for the wonderful video! We love to see our customer's birds happy with our products. Yes, it can take some time for the certain bluebirds to figure out and get used to this feeder. Usually 1-4 weeks, but everyone's birds are different. When people are starting out we typically suggest that they scatter some mealworms around the edges by the barrier guard and on the top of the feeder too. It can help the birds realize there are tasty treats inside.

We do sell the perch accessory for this feeder that gives the bluebirds a place to land and figure out how to get in through the barrier. It is also a nice thing to have for the young bluebirds. The parents will bring them to the feeders, and they will sit on the perches while the adults feed them and teach them how to go in and out of the feeder as well. You can check the perch out here: https://nature-niche.com/products/barrier-guard-feeder-perch-accessory?_pos=28&_sid=80d5bf009&_ss=r

K
Kim Stauffer
UPDATED: Barrier Guard Specialty Bluebird Feeder - Copper Tint

Well, patience paid off. The birds are so happy with this new feeder! Shortly after my 1st review, some brave birds gave it a go and now they are feeding daily and not threatening anymore by the bully grackles. Love this feeder - I get so many compliments on it too!

Thank you for your feedback. Yes, we've found that it can take some people's bluebirds a month or more to figure this feeder out (usually within two weeks, but sometimes more). But once they do, it's a great way to keep them fed and the large, unwanted birds like European starlings at bay. I'm hoping with a little more time, your resident bluebirds will figure it out! I personally use this feeder at home with much success. You can see the feeder in action in this recent environmental education post: https://youtu.be/w9PUJuHcfUg and an older version of this feeder with a view from the inside from the manufacturer: https://youtu.be/NpG25gtUATY With a little more time, your bluebirds should be happy and protected from the bully birds!

I've also had customers place mealworms on top of the feeder and/or along the sides on the floor to draw them in and get them exploring what is inside. You can also try setting the feeder out with the cover off to the side to train the birds that there are good things inside. Lastly, you mentioned other birds are not using the feeder. Usually the chickadees, tufted titmice, and wrens often figure this feeder out ahead of the bluebirds. I would survey the location of this feeder just to be sure something else isn't deterring the birds--no wind chimes, whirligigs, wind spinners, etc. that might be spooking them? Is it located near other feeders they are using and/or within easy distance of protective cover like trees and shrubs? Hope this helps!

D
Donald Cunningham
Keeps those Mockingbirds out

It took my Orioles about 3 days to come to the feeder but now they are on the feeder regularly. And they get to feed without being harassed by the Mockingbird. Thanks

L
Lori Carlson
Keeps out grackles!

I searched a lot for a bluebird feeder that would keep the grackles out. They are such pigs! They try but cannot reach the meal worms! Unfortunately, my bluebirds will not go through the wire cage at all. It has been several weeks now. Other small birds use the feeder daily, but my bluebirds now eat from my tube feeder. I like the extra perch, but a piece falls off occasionally. Overall I am pleased with the feeder.

Thanks for your feedback! We're finding that some peoples' bluebirds just take longer than others to figure this feeder out. A few days up to a month is what I've heard from my customers. You can try putting mealworms on top of the roof and along the edges of the floor to help them get started. The perch accessory will help, too. If you are losing pieces off of the perch unit, you may need to really tighten down the locking nuts underneath with pliers and retighten occasionally if they are tapping against something routinely. Here's a post I did on proper assembly for the perch accessory--hope this helps: https://youtu.be/tcVuQv9y0R8

Customer Reviews

Based on 15 reviews
93%
(14)
7%
(1)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
D
Deborah Barman
Great Feeder

It is as beautiful as it looks. Perfect weight which makes it easy to hang yet it can ride out strong summer storms. Waiting for my first bluebird but that will happen in time. Glad I bought it.

J
John Shaw
It took a while

I bought my feeder in July 2022 to feed meal worms to bluebirds. I didn’t see much success until now. This spring, a male and a female have been feeding every day around 6:00 am. They would take turns each patiently waiting for the other to finish eating. An couple days ago, they started stuffing several worms in their beaks and flying away, so they must be feeding babies!

Thank you for taking time to review, and for the wonderful video! We love to see our customer's birds happy with our products. Yes, it can take some time for the certain bluebirds to figure out and get used to this feeder. Usually 1-4 weeks, but everyone's birds are different. When people are starting out we typically suggest that they scatter some mealworms around the edges by the barrier guard and on the top of the feeder too. It can help the birds realize there are tasty treats inside.

We do sell the perch accessory for this feeder that gives the bluebirds a place to land and figure out how to get in through the barrier. It is also a nice thing to have for the young bluebirds. The parents will bring them to the feeders, and they will sit on the perches while the adults feed them and teach them how to go in and out of the feeder as well. You can check the perch out here: https://nature-niche.com/products/barrier-guard-feeder-perch-accessory?_pos=28&_sid=80d5bf009&_ss=r

K
Kim Stauffer
UPDATED: Barrier Guard Specialty Bluebird Feeder - Copper Tint

Well, patience paid off. The birds are so happy with this new feeder! Shortly after my 1st review, some brave birds gave it a go and now they are feeding daily and not threatening anymore by the bully grackles. Love this feeder - I get so many compliments on it too!

Thank you for your feedback. Yes, we've found that it can take some people's bluebirds a month or more to figure this feeder out (usually within two weeks, but sometimes more). But once they do, it's a great way to keep them fed and the large, unwanted birds like European starlings at bay. I'm hoping with a little more time, your resident bluebirds will figure it out! I personally use this feeder at home with much success. You can see the feeder in action in this recent environmental education post: https://youtu.be/w9PUJuHcfUg and an older version of this feeder with a view from the inside from the manufacturer: https://youtu.be/NpG25gtUATY With a little more time, your bluebirds should be happy and protected from the bully birds!

I've also had customers place mealworms on top of the feeder and/or along the sides on the floor to draw them in and get them exploring what is inside. You can also try setting the feeder out with the cover off to the side to train the birds that there are good things inside. Lastly, you mentioned other birds are not using the feeder. Usually the chickadees, tufted titmice, and wrens often figure this feeder out ahead of the bluebirds. I would survey the location of this feeder just to be sure something else isn't deterring the birds--no wind chimes, whirligigs, wind spinners, etc. that might be spooking them? Is it located near other feeders they are using and/or within easy distance of protective cover like trees and shrubs? Hope this helps!

D
Donald Cunningham
Keeps those Mockingbirds out

It took my Orioles about 3 days to come to the feeder but now they are on the feeder regularly. And they get to feed without being harassed by the Mockingbird. Thanks

L
Lori Carlson
Keeps out grackles!

I searched a lot for a bluebird feeder that would keep the grackles out. They are such pigs! They try but cannot reach the meal worms! Unfortunately, my bluebirds will not go through the wire cage at all. It has been several weeks now. Other small birds use the feeder daily, but my bluebirds now eat from my tube feeder. I like the extra perch, but a piece falls off occasionally. Overall I am pleased with the feeder.

Thanks for your feedback! We're finding that some peoples' bluebirds just take longer than others to figure this feeder out. A few days up to a month is what I've heard from my customers. You can try putting mealworms on top of the roof and along the edges of the floor to help them get started. The perch accessory will help, too. If you are losing pieces off of the perch unit, you may need to really tighten down the locking nuts underneath with pliers and retighten occasionally if they are tapping against something routinely. Here's a post I did on proper assembly for the perch accessory--hope this helps: https://youtu.be/tcVuQv9y0R8